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DIY/Lo-Fi





The Deli Philly's December Record of the Month: Welcome - Slaughter Beach, Dog

Jake Ewald, well-known as one-fourth of Modern Baseball, steps into the spotlight on his first full-length album as Slaughter Beach, Dog. Suitably titled Welcome (Lame-O Records), Ewald’s ten-track confessional holds nothing back. Each melody and each emotion is unfettered and nostalgic without apology. Like the grownup and more articulate version of your favorite band from undergrad, Slaughter Beach, Dog’s dream-pop adjacent anthems will melt your heart with ease.
 
Opening with the self-aware ‘90s throwback “Mall-rat Semiannual,” Welcome’s strength lies in Ewald’s ability to build an entire universe within a matter of seconds. Like a lyrical rendering of an intricate diorama, the album’s first track unfolds with earnest inflection, sway-worthy riffs, and a romanticism reminiscent of Pavement’s “Gold Soundz” meshed with Modest Mouse’s “Dramamine”. The directness of “Toronto Mug” is perfectly mirrored by the its brevity, while “Monsters” feels like the song you wish you wrote about yourself, depicting with precise rhythm what it means to be haunted by the shortcomings of others as well as your own.
 
“Bed Fest” plays out like the soundtrack to a mumblecore flick at its climax - bittersweet and subtle - awash in acoustic chords and swelling snare, ending in trippy reverb as Ewald croons, “You can’t stay here.” “Forever” and “Jobs” are pragmatic snapshots of the millennial plight framed by poppy backbeats and relatable proclamations like “I think that we’re better off just believing in ourselves, but that’s just me.” A sweet but solemn love song, “Politics of Grooming,” effortlessly bleeds into “Drinks,” a wistful theme for lovers not quite over their past, but unafraid of diving headfirst into the future, hand in hand despite misgivings. Like a premature epilogue, “Toronto Mug II” is lo-fi in all the right ways, serving as a welcomed primer to the album’s instrumental exit, “Essex Street.”
 
Staying true to its namesake, Slaughter Beach, Dog’s latest slew of songs will remind you of where you came from and who you really are. - Dianca London

December 2016
Slaughter Beach, Dog
"Welcome
"
mp3
Jake Ewald, well-known as one-fourth of Modern Baseball, steps into the spotlight on his first full-length album as Slaughter Beach, Dog. Suitably titled Welcome, Ewald’s ten-track confessional holds nothing back. Each melody and each emotion is unfettered and nostalgic without apology. Like the grownup and more articulate version of your favorite band from undergrad, Slaughter Beach, Dog’s dream-pop adjacent anthems will melt your heart with ease.
 
Opening with the self-aware ‘90s throwback “Mall-rat Semiannual,” Welcome’s strength lies in Ewald’s ability to build an entire universe within a matter of seconds. Like a lyrical rendering of an intricate diorama, the album’s first track unfolds with earnest inflection, sway-worthy riffs, and a romanticism reminiscent of Pavement’s “Gold Soundz” meshed with Modest Mouse’s “Dramamine”. The directness of “Toronto Mug” is perfectly mirrored by the its brevity, while “Monsters” feels like the song you wish you wrote about yourself, depicting with precise rhythm what it means to be haunted by the shortcomings of others as well as your own.
 
“Bed Fest” plays out like the soundtrack to a mumblecore flick at its climax - bittersweet and subtle - awash in acoustic chords and swelling snare, ending in trippy reverb as Ewald croons, “You can’t stay here.” “Forever” and “Jobs” are pragmatic snapshots of the millennial plight framed by poppy backbeats and relatable proclamations like “I think that we’re better off just believing in ourselves, but that’s just me.” A sweet but solemn love song, “Politics of Grooming,” effortlessly bleeds into “Drinks,” a wistful theme for lovers not quite over their past, but unafraid of diving headfirst into the future, hand in hand despite misgivings. Like a premature epilogue, “Toronto Mug II” is lo-fi in all the right ways, serving as a welcomed primer to the album’s instrumental exit, “Essex Street.”
 
Staying true to its namesake, Slaughter Beach, Dog’s latest slew of songs will remind you of where you came from and who you really are. - Dianca London




Stream: Dowager - 'Title Track'

It's refreshing to see that the screamo-emo-hardcore stylings many of us grew up enjoying, though often denied, is again becoming a popular genre. Local trio Dowager have been receiving much and well deserved press as eclipsing purveyors of this musical class, especially with their long awaited and recently released Title Track EP.

Title Track, which came out the day after November's notorious food fest, is five songs worth of formulaically aggressive screamocore that translates into an addicting experience in headphones and on stage.

Dowager's all-ages release show for Title Track will be this Saturday at Black Water with the bewitchingly darling Bashface, Seattle's Curse League and one of the best band names to come out of 2016, Dranky Skelerton (members of Robot Boy and Don Quixote). 

If you haven't been doing this already, stream Title Track again and again until the weekend.





Mood Music: Sallo - "The Creeping Locust (L)"

Rumor has it Portland may be getting hit with some snow coming up soon. Will it be enough to lead us into forced snowpacalype hibernation? Doubt it, but if you're into that sort of thing anyway, you likely know the importance of having premium tunes to soundtrack your isolation. Enter Sallo and in particular, their track "The Creeping Locust (L)."

Post-rock has made a glorious comeback in the city's scene and Sallo, a strictly keys and drums endeavor done by Shelly Strunk and Mark Brittenburg, vaunts magic through experimental, haunting classical instrumentation. Their music has been featured on theater stages and in films and their collaborations span from work with string ensembles to comedy troupes. Now, let them serve as a score to your hopefully snowy confinement.

Sallo will be playing this Friday at the High Water Mark with shred-masters Toim and enlivened warrior princess metal from headliners Ice Princess





New Joshua Bright Album Available for Streaming & Purchase

A supernatural, psychedelic hue radiates from the raspy, tortured folk of Joshua Bright. With his new album And All Along A Wolf, which was produced by fellow Man Like Machine compatriot Giuseppe DiCristino, as well as Keith Blackmore, Bright delivers a futuristic take on isolation. A hauntingly desolate, Americana feel is illuminated by the shimmer of spacey synth.

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