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Electronic





Thievery Corporation Thaws Austin with Spiritualized Vibes

  Frigid temperatures seeped through the inadequate winter wear of Austinites gathered at Stubbs on Wednesday night. With indoor concerts like Two Door Cinema Club, the Black Keys and Modest Mouse all happening around town on the same night; it wouldn't be illogical to think that music fans might opt for a cozy, comfortable venue in which they could enjoy their beer and music without harsh artic winds blowing around them. Yet the tandem of New York-based party outfit, Brazilian Girls, and the Austin-affiliated eclectic electronica group, Thievery Corporation, would bring a dedicated crowd that mitigated the November frost by manifesting a soulful dance party.

Brazilian Girls' original lead singer, Sabina Sciubba, declined to come on tour; yet her presence was hardly missed since her replacement, Sophia Urista, injected a youthful vigor and smoldering sexuality into the band's dynamic. Gyrating and erupting through the band's staccato hit "Pirates", it became clear that Sophia had no qualms making these songs her own. As the crowd continued to trickle in, Brazilian Girls began to hit the zenith of their set with elongated jams to hits like "Don't Stop" and "Pussy". The festive and tropical stylings of Brazilian Girls served as a perfect preface to the spiritual zionist vibes of Thievery Corporation that would follow.

It has to be a powerful force that can pull Austinites out of their central-heated homes and into freezing temperatures, but Thievery Corporation transcends being 'just another' touring band - they're an immersive experience. While the foundational duo of Thievery was incomplete (Rob Garza was present but not Eric Hilton), the constant stream of featured artists kept the audience fixated on what felt like a variety show stage of incredible talent. A melange of exotic musical influences weave through the band's sound, all tethered together with a streak of elevated consciousness. A bedouin-influenced opener of "Facing East" soon flowed into the latin-styled "Sol Tapado" which then warped into the politically conscious hip-hop track "Culture of Fear". A parade of featured artists emerged on nearly every track: Mr. Lif, LouLou, Puma and the indomitable Raquel Jones. 

The epoch of the show would arrive with the Thievery's mega-hit "Lebanese Blonde", followed by the francophile-disco track "Voyage Libre", which was bookended by the heart-wrenching "Sweet Tides". An intimate acoustic interlude was unexpected but allowed a degree of gravity and introspection that cleansed the palate for the last few songs."Ghettomatrix" and "Richest Man In Babylon" would close out a night of spiritual ebullience. In a time when extremes seem to polarize, strain and distance us - Thievery Corporation brought an atmosphere of benevolence and self-love that warmed every soul bearing the wintry winds of our time.

- Lee Ackerley

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Tatum Gale’s “Blue Haze” is a spooky, seasonal bop

“Blue Haze” is the latest “end-of-summer glassy groove” from New York synth outsider Tatum Gale, and while billed as a seasonally-apt slow jam when it came out in September, it’s spooky, dark drops resonate just as closely during these sub-30 November nights. Between its hazy chords and spacey percussive backbone, the track endows the listeners with a sense of distance, making it perfect listening for a small kickback among close friends or a dissociative episode in the club. Gale’s additional ability to inject indietronica into a future-funk bop gives “Blue Haze” a sound that’s accessible as it is groovy; stream it below to get your weekend started right. Connor Beckett McInerney

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Lexica unearth "lost" album, release trippy single "Faint Hue"

Lexica, an experimental group formed in the burgeoning arts scene in mid-Nineties Harlem, have released Lost & Left To Be Imagined, an album which up until now never saw the light of day. The 2002 recording, which featured the trippy proto-EDM stylings of Lorraine Lelis, Stephen Krieger, and Erik Laroi, was well-hyped before its release, but ended up in the dustbin of history. However, the band was finally able to unearth it, and with it, the single "Faint Hue", a shimmering song which features Lelis's layered vocals, the relaxing and haunting beats of Kreiger, and the subtle but powerful guitar work of Laroi. Give this long-lost track a listen for yourself down below. - Will Sisskind

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Jakob Battick releases folk psych collection Tour Tape 2019

Earlier this month Jakob Battick, the Berkeley-based musician (originally hailing from the great state of Maine) released Tour Tape 2019, digitally and as a limited edition cassette. For fans of quiet psych folk who appreciate a touch of drone and drifting off into spacey realms. A personal favorite off the collection, “Lilac Bloom” showcases more melodic moments and a lovely female vocal accompaniment. Props to Liam Herb for the crystal wine glass work on these tunes and just the right amount of mystical synth. Feels like just the right kind of tunes to stargaze to. -Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor





Pan American "A Son"

Mark Nelson (aka Pan•American) is preparing to release a new album called “A Son” on November 7th via Kranky.

The album’s first single and closing track is beautiful acoustic take on a classic track called “Shenandoah”. Nelson begin playing this song in the days following the death of Heather Heyer, and including the track on this album as a tribute and to draw attention to her foundation.

This album finds Nelson putting aside the electronics in favor of the hammered dulcimer, but holding true to the ambient and atmospheric he has become known for over the last decade.

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