x
the_deli_magazine

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

national

National Site




Gambler's share their indie pop in debut EP “Corinthian Order”

After honing their skills through a variety of production work and live show appearances, Brooklyn indie pop-rockers Gamblers have released the debut EP Corinthian Order (streaming below). The opening title track makes use of retro Farfisa-style keys, plucked electronic sounds and unadorned guitar arpeggios as a softly sung tale of breakup builds towards its do-do-do denouement. “We're Bound To Be Together” masquerades outwardly as a buoyant uptempo rocker with Strokes-style churning guitars and Beatles-eque harmonies. A dichotomy is revealed as those words of love are meant to reflect an addict's blissful state while on drugs. “Heavenly Mouse Routine” leans on its forward march beat, buzzy synth texture and staccato plucked guitar to approximate the repetitiveness that afflicts humanity. “There Was A Window” builds off the bands' hip-hop production roots with percussive underpinnings serving an otherwise lo-fi/slacker rock approach. Closing track “The Selfish Bell” initially rocks harder through its chunky drum beat, distorted electric guitars and snaking bass line; falsetto vocals depict scenarios of self-imposed limitations against an expanding, near prog-rock-like composition. The EP is available for ordering via itunes as well as streaming on spotify. - Dave Cromwell

|




Jiants - "Odd Trouble", Playin' The Garrison 10.17

Fresh indie rock from Toronto; Jiants blends 90’s alt-rock with “modern indie sensibilities”. Their latest record “Odd Trouble” was released earlier this year. The title track leads off the album with a relaxed pace, in-the-pocket rhythm section and a vocal melody that could be a blend of Coldplay and Neil Young. It has some rural indie rock feels despite being straight from the city. Jiants will be opening for Restorations along with Wild Pink at the Garrison on October 17th. – Kris Gies

|




The Brazen Youth sit down with Will Orchard (LBBHoB) for Q&A

The story of how Will Orchard, Nicholas Lussier, Micah Rubin, and Charles Dahlke make music is almost unbelievable, almost too idyllic to be possible. The four friends live together at Ashlawn Farm in Lyme, Connecticut — a three-hundred year old farm that now serves as a creative community for likeminded DIY artists. Orchard, who goes by the name LittleBoyBigHeadonBike, premiered his hundredth release, Big Blue Butterflies, on The Deli Magazine - New England. He is currently on tour (as he almost always seems to be,) but recently filled in on bass with with Lussier, Rubin, and Dahlke, who make up The Brazen Youth, while they were promoting their LP Primitive Initiative. Rather than leading a discussion with the four musicians, The Deli Magazine took a step back while they interviewed each other about the different ways they make music, the impact of the farm, and the experience of touring with friends. - Lilly Milman

Nicholas Lussier: As an artist, in what ways do the real-you and the ideal-you differ?

Will Orchard: It’s hard to say what those are in relation, because sometimes I think one is the other. Sometimes, I look at what I’ve created and what I’ve done and I think that’s who I am as an artist. And I guess that’s good, because that’s a self-loving thought. Whereas sometimes I think the ideal me is something that I actually am. But I don’t see it. When I don’t think about the ideal me as an artist — that’s when I am the ideal me. And when I do think about it — that’s when I’m not.

Nicholas: The year is 2038. You’re sitting in a bar in Flagstaff, AZ. I don’t know why it’s Flagstaff. It just is, okay? Somebody sits down next to you, you start talking, and they eventually ask what you were up to in your early 20s. What do you want future Will to say, in retrospection?

Will: The farm was the single most direction-changing, life-changing thing in my entire life so far. Possibly forever. And I didn’t realize it would be that at all. It showed me all these ways that my life could be — and not just the farm, but all the things the farm brought. Touring…

Micah Rubin: Friends?

Will: Yeah, totally! Friends. And the farm allowed me to see so many different lifestyles, and the millions of ways life could be. And it made me, maybe not unafraid, but much less afraid to do those things. It had a sense of freedom within a safety net — a sort of bubble. And it all happened so randomly. I don’t actually recall being invited to live here… I just remember being in the room as you guys decided to do this and saying “yeah, I am so down for that!”

Charles Dahlke: I feel that Thoreau quote of stables pushing the barn before them, and I don't know how I was born into this, and it’s a burden and a privilege.

Will: I have a question for Micah. What do you think the farm is going to be like for you in so long, because you didn’t go to college first  you probably made the boldest decision out of all of us. How do you think this will all change your view on things?

Micah: I don’t know what it’s gonna be like in the future is my first answer, but I was talking to Nick today about how I’m simply excited to have these experiences and be able to tell the stories to my children. I’m waiting patiently for the nostalgia of the farm to set in. In a way, I hope I never have to feel 100 percent nostalgic because that could imply that I’d be removed from the farm for a long period of time. In terms of the question about college: I was always planning on taking a gap year. So, for me, it fell into place very early on.

This is a story about the first day I ever got to the farm. This was the morning after Nick and Charlie picked me up in Providence for their show with Will. That show was actually the first time I met Will, as well. We pulled up to the front of the house and Charlie was in the studio. Right as we pulled up he opened the door and looking grave said, “Guys, someone hit Crystal.” I was like “Who the fuck is Crystal?” Charlie mentions that Crystal was one of the goats on the farm. Some jackass smashed her with his car and didn’t stop. It was a hit and run.

About an hour had went by when Nick was like “Yo, we should take the Mule [an ATV] and show Micah around.” Charlie was like “Yo, totally,” but then realized that Crystal’s body was in the back waiting to be put in the compost pile. My first drive around the front field was very interesting, considering we were accompanied by Crystal. Within 15 minutes, we had successful dumped the goat near the edge of the field, near the woods. We drove back and chilled for another hour or so until Charlie’s mom called. She was pissed that we just dumped the goat and told Charlie that we all had to go back and retrieve the goat and put it back where it was. A few minutes after Charlie got off the phone, he told Nick and I what his mom had said. We looked at each other in a bit of disbelief, but were like “I guess we gotta do this.”

Nick and Charlie were the ones who hoisted the goat back into the back of the Mule. We drove back and left it beside the compost pile. In retrospect, this was a very funny moment, even though Crystal did die an awful death. It’s what made me fall in love with the farm. I just loved the weirdness of it from the start, but also the sense of belonging and home. The farm is just this huge body that hugs all the people in its presence.

Charles: How do you compare touring for your project and touring as a bass player for The Brazen Youth?

Will: It’s easier to put intensity and passion into my own music, but a part of me feels really inspired seeing the people come on tour with me in my band and seeing the intensity that they put into my music — even if they have no reason to feel connected to it. And seeing that made me think “Wow, I can do that with somebody else’s music.” For you guys, it's your band, and when you're on stage with another band it’s just this formless collaborative experience. It becomes everyone’s experience — regardless of who created the music. So, much of my journey as a bass player has been learning to feel connected to everyone — detaching any sense of ownership while in the midst of a song.

Will: Whats it like just having one person, myself, that’s not a part of the creative process?

Charles: It's just so useful having someone help lock in on stage.

Nicholas: It's really helpful on tour when someone in the band’s feeling discouraged. It’s just nice to have somebody who isn’t really even being credited for it, who just wants to give us their time and energy, simply for the sake of doing so. Like, Will, you probably get into it more than any of us do. The only way I can really explain it is that it’s just this very necessary external energy coming in. It’s very validating and it’s good to have that coming from someone you seriously respect. 

Will: When you feel discouraged because it’s your music and it’s so personal, and something isn’t going well, it can feel good to be with someone who is less attached to the music but they’re still having a great time with it. What’s it like having someone (Micah) in the band who is part of the creative process, but isn’t a songwriter?

Nicholas: I feel like as soon as they play, it’s no longer a song I wrote. It doesn’t really matter whose song it is, since there’s an immense amount of musical trust.

Charles: Micah's performance is probably one of the most artistic performances out of all of us. Micah will want to stay in the booth for hours and keep running tapes. Like, when I was listening to Primitive Initiative, I saw that what Micah was trying to explain throughout the whole year was explained in the album, and that is the most incredible thing to see.

Listen to tracks by both of these artists on The Deli New England's brand new Spotify playlist, Cold Cuts: Sounds of New England.

header image: 
sites/upload-files/imagecache/review_image/willxbrazenyouth.jpg
author: 
Lilly Milman
Subtitle (brief and awesome): 
LittleBoyBigHeadonBike and The Brazen Youth ask each other about living on Ashlawn farm, touring with friends, and differences in their creative processes.
Excerpt (short interesting quote from the Q&A): 
"The farm is just this huge body that hugs all the people in its presence" - Micah Rubin, The Brazen Youth
|




Samia Releases New Single 'Milk,' Plays Rough Trade on Thu, Sep 27th

With her boundless voice and blistering lyricism, Samia has a special knack for revealing big situations through intimate details. Whether discussing her hamster's name in '21,' or getting a rock star to listen to her music on 'The Night Josh Tillman Listened To My Song,' Samia finds lyrical perch by baring her soul through an itinerary of the everyday.

I thought of this while watching the video for her latest single, 'Milk.' Despite Samia's repeated assurances throughout, I get the impression that the mess she is referring to here is more than 'just spilled milk.' No matter how often she tells you not to worry, or how many interesting details she confesses throughout (bathing in the grease on the McDonald's floor, jumping off the pier at the seaport) you know there's also something left unsaid, lingering like a suggestive gloss under the track's shadowy contours and pulsating tension. It also marks an exciting turn from her previous work. Samia's voice was never a stranger to the anxieties of growing up in a world that tends to shame the thoughts, voices, and bodies of outspoken feminists. But on 'Milk,' the emotional dial is turned up even louder, revealing what in other singers would be vulnerabilities. For Samia, these serve as forceful reminders of just how potent an artist she is becoming. Watch the video below, and see Samia perform at Rough Trade on Thursday, September 27th. - Mike Levine (@goldnuggets)





Paige Hargrove "Leo" Video

Singer/Songwriter Paige Hargrove is preparing to release her debut album, Georgia, on Sept. 21st. She recently released that album’s first single “Leo” accompanied by a beautifully directed video.

You can catch her on September 27th at Uncommon Ground (1401 W. Devon) with Zach Pietrini.

|
|
|

- news for musician and music pros -

Loading...